All about weed

How to Distinguish Bad Weed from Good Weed

good weed

First, let’s cover our bases and go over the common terms used when shopping for good weed. “Flower” refers to the dried and cured female cannabis plant’s blooms, often called “nugs” or “buds.” Flower is typically intoxicating — THC content is the primary indicator of euphoric potency — but some flower has high CBD content and will produce less intoxicating effects. 

The best smoking experiences, edibles, tinctures — even CBD oil — often come from the best source material, or “top-shelf bud.” In terms of slang, premium weed is also commonly referred to as the “loud,” “fire,” “dank,” and “Private Reserve.” Low-grade weed is often referred to as “schwag,” “brick,” “ditch,” and “bunk” weed.

Identifying high-quality flower can throw even the most experienced cannabis connoisseurs for a loop, but the key traits that separate good weed from bad weed are smell, appearance, feel, and flower structure. In this article, we’ll break down all four and offer tips for spotting the good stuff and avoiding the bad. 

ypes of Weed: Determining Marijuana Quality

The world of weed is rich with different types and new strains options. To the beginner, it can be a little bit tricky to figure out what’s dank and what’s schwag. You want the best of the best, but you don’t even know how to ask for it (or you may not recognize it when you see it).

Does that sound like you? No problem. We’re here to help. Today we are going to explore all of the various types of cannabis currently available for consumption to help you understand the quality of weed that you smoke and how to select the best cannabis to smoke.

Want some high-quality weed? Read on to figure out how to get it!

What to look for in good weed

good weed

1. Smell: Cannabis cultivated and cured to the highest standards typically exhibits a pungent and pleasant aroma. Flowers emitting a strong fragrance are commonly referred to as having a “dank” or “loud” odor, indicating the overall quality of the flower. There are a variety of terms for the types of aromas high-quality cannabis emits, including skunk, diesel, and pine. The common denominator is that a good-smelling flower is distinct, pungent, and unmistakable. The stronger the fragrance is, the more nuanced the experience is likely to be.

2. Look: High-end flower, like fresh, healthy produce, provides a few visual hints to help you determine its quality. While all good cannabis should be visually appealing, a top-shelf strain can easily display a vibrant array of colors. Good-quality flowers are often a deep green with flaming orange or red hairs. They can also express colors from deep purple to bright blue.

Another important visual indicator of good weed is the amount and viability of trichomes. Trichomes are the tiny, glimmering crystal-like appendages on the plant’s surface that create and hold the compounds responsible for the flower’s smell, flavor, and effects. The more frosty trichomes you can see with the naked eye, the better indicator of the flower’s intoxicating and therapeutic potency. If your eyesight has seen better days or you want to get up close, use a magnifying glass to get an even better sense of a nug’s trichomes.

3. Feel: Top-shelf flower should be sticky and slightly spongy when you touch or gently squeeze it between your fingers. Stems should snap and the bud should be relatively easy to break apart, but shouldn’t be completely dry or crumble when you touch it. Alternatively, buds shouldn’t be too wet or soft, since these have a higher chance of developing or containing mold or mildew. 

4. Flower structure: Skillfully cultivated and cured sativa-leaning flowers tend to be light and fluffy in shape and composition, while indicas tend to be tighter and denser in flower structure. Though the structure and the experience you end up having usually have little to do with each other. Rock-hard flowers are a sign that cultivators may have used plant growth regulators, which can lead to an unpleasant taste. Extremely fluffy flowers could be a signal that the plant was not grown under sufficient light intensity and was not cultivated to its potential. 

While top-shelf flower is the hallmark of a great dispensary, good flower comes in many shapes and sizes and has more than a few nicknames.

Characteristics of Bad Low-Quality Weed

Feel

Feel is, of course, going to be relative to the individual but for what it is worth, Reggie weed definitely does not have a reputation for delivering a killer buzz.

This is definitely one of the more mild weeds on the market but even that said the worst pot is still pot, right?

If you are a seasoned stoner a little bit of Reggie might not even really hit your system but if you are just starting out you should still notice a nice relaxing feeling setting in shortly after your smoke.

Smell

Reggie has the typical skunky smell that is commonly associated with cannabis, though many also detect a faint sweet component to the odor as well.

Mostly you will probably just notice that the smell is extremely strong. If you want to keep your business on the down low smoking Reggie might not be the best route for you to take.

Taste

Taste is another area that Reggie typically falls short. A taste will ultimately be dictated at least in part by the circumstances under which the bud was grown, but in general, Reggie tends to be very harsh, very skunky, with earthy notes that you may or may not care for.

It’s not necessarily the worst taste in the world but it does lack the nuanced flavor that some of the top shelf strains are able to boast.

Effects

This is the stereotypical stoner bud. The effects are quick but relatively mild and it’s more known for promoting the munchies than it is for treating any serious ailments.

If you are looking for a nice way to relax at the end of a tough day as you curl up with some Scooby Doo and Cheetos, Reggie might be able to help facilitate that.

If you are looking for a serious medicinal strain, keep on looking.

THC

The THC content in most Reggie ranges from around 15-18%. Better strains of weed generally boast a THC level of about 30%, with variations going as high as 60%.

That might not mean very much to you, but to put it in context, it’s a little bit like the difference between tequila and a light beer.

Of course, not everyone wants a super high THC count. It really comes down to a matter of preference, and what you are trying to accomplish at a given moment.

If all you want is to get mildly centered as you go about your day, a little bit of Reggie should still do the job nicely.

Good or Bad Weed – An Overview

good weed

Good

  • Marijuana you find on the top or middle shelves.
  • Typically has a healthy green color with a wide array of stunning hues and undertones.
  • A ‘fresh’ scent with different aromas depending on the strain.
  • Comprised mainly of buds and covered with glistening trichomes.
  • Sativas have a fluffy structure, while indicas are tight and dense.
  • Hand-trimmed to preserve buds and terpenes.

Bad

  • What you see on the bottom shelf in your dispensary.
  • Often brown, tan, red, white, or yellow in color.
  • A stale scent or no smell at all. If it smells ‘gone off,’ avoid!
  • Contains a noticeable quantity of seeds and stems.
  • Loose open structure and visible stems.
  • Has a mangled look as if it was damaged by a machine.

Conclusion

Never underestimate the potential impact that crap weed has on your health. Smoking low-grade marijuana can be brutal on your throat and will not be much better for you than using a few tobacco cigarettes. Also, don’t forget to check your weed for signs of mold or rot. Moldy weed will look similar to what you find on expired cheese, bread, etc.

Whenever possible, try and purchase your marijuana from a reputable source, such as a licensed dispensary. If there are none near you, you’ll have to take your chances with a local dealer – which in many cases is illegal. Never break the law, and always know and understand the legalities of the area that you’re in before you go to buy pot.

We hope that this information on how to tell good weed from bad weed has been helpful and informative – if you’ve got any additional tips or suggestions, be sure to leave a comment below and share your ideas with the community!

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